Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling
Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling

Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling

BETTER Environment, RECYCLING Campaign FBWRI

Definition of the issue in general:

Solid waste or products disposed of everyday by people all over the planet has always been a significant environmental problem, but the rapid increase of the world’s population has been greatly aggravated.

With the advent of recycling initiatives in many parts of the world and awareness-raising campaigns, the amount of waste produced per person has actually decreased slightly. Declining as possible, due to the population factor, the amount of solid waste produced daily has seen a massive increase.

Dealing with waste in the past has become more of a concern with where to hide it, not what to do with it. There is now a increasing movement and drive, both grass-roots and political, to address this issue head-on and to find realistic and feasible ways to address this delicate issue.

Solid waste is no longer considered to be necessary products that are discarded by both human and animal activities. They’re covering everything from:

Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling
Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling

Organic items: food waste, carcasses, seeds, urine, etc.

Inorganic items: plastic, metal , wood, chemicals, tyres / rubber, batteries, packaging, cardboard, etc.

A sound recycling programme may effectively recycle more than 90% of all these forms of waste, turning it into recycled items such as carton and plastic or as a source of fuel for the production of methane gas from human waste.

Unfortunately, there is no systematic recycling scheme anywhere in the world, rather various countries, and cities / municipals are implementing sections of a coherent recycling programme to focus on restricted recycling activities based on the resources they have available to create such programmes.

Improving the recovery of waste products, proper usage and sound recycling procedures.

It has been shown that the passage of legislation requiring people to sort their garbage into proper recycling bins has no impact on the rise in recycling. Awareness campaigns to raise customer consciences by encouraging them to take care of the environment have become far more effective. It’s easier for a person to recycle because he / she knows it’s the right thing to do, and not because he / she feels compelled to do it.

The biggest inhibitor of any recycling campaign in the world is a lack of funding, a lack of manpower and a lack of facilities to address the problem properly.

When anything is a company and offers a profit motive, many businesses and individuals will participate more than willingly. If it is simply a moral duty or a legal obligation, there is no guarantee that people can comply with it.

Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling
Creation of Community-Based Organizations and Awareness Programs for Recycling

How are we going to inspire people to recycle?

The expression “What’s in it for me?” definitely refers to a recycling campaign like every other social initiative. If the existing arguments are described as in

“This is good for the environment,”

“This is the best thing to do.”

“This is for a better future”

Then we roll the dice hoping that we’ll pull enough moral strings that we can effectively inspire people to recycle, but it’s just a game with no observable means to ensure its success.

Now, if we offer an opportunity to complement the moral case, we will significantly increase our chances of success and citizen participation.

In this capitalist society, what motivates people more than anything else is the ability to make money. Recycling has been shown to be a very profitable industry, but to select businesses that are engaged in business, not to the customer.

Exchange of benefits

Governments could have an opportunity where, when people submit their properly separate products to designated recycling facilities, they receive a voucher and each voucher is worth points. This may be called “RP’s” or “Recycle Points.

” With these RP’s, people will then be given discounts either by the private sector as an additional incentive for people to patronise their shops, either by the government sector on discounts on the payment of their taxes, public utilities, or some other definition under which money is raised for services.

Private sector involvement:

A pilot programme can be introduced with selected national retailers providing discounts on their goods and services in return for RP’s. The retailer will then, in exchange, obtain tax discounts from the government on all the “RPs” they have received.

Why is FBWRI?
Waste management has hit a critical mass. It can no longer be buried in earth-fillings and easily tucked away from the way it has always been done in the past. Not only is there a problem of too much waste and too little space, but there is also a rising problem of the world running low on resources.

The throw-away model of society may have succeeded in the past when the world was a much smaller location, but this impudent ideology may no longer offer a viable future direction for societies. Many products that are thrown away have only been used to package a product, and such packaging can be easily recycled and reused.

The citizen needs to be made aware that all current events in his or her life can, in turn, impact the quality of life in the short term and in the long term for his or her own children. The idea of “it doesn’t affect me” needs to be replaced by “it affects all of us.”

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